Three years ago, the Governor’s Office and the Office of Enterprise Technology Services launched eSign Service, leveraging an Adobe enterprise agreement that provided an electronic document signing solution for Hawaii state government agencies.

The Governor’s Office piloted the program, requiring departments to submit documents for the governor’s signature using an electronic routing form template.

To-date, there have been a total of 424,191 electronic transactions. But more importantly than the total, adoption has increased to an average of 22,898 transactions per month, and the average time to sign documents has improved to 259.4 minutes (it used to be days).

eSign Services continues to be a success story. By centralizing the Adobe contract, ETS reduced the state executive branch’s Adobe Acrobat Pro software expenditures by $1.5 million. In addition, the Adobe enterprise agreement not only powering the electronic service solution, but also promoting greater web accessibility by making the latest version of Adobe Acrobat available to state employees, and encouraging creative and collaborative work by making the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of applications available to personnel.

For more information, visit the eSign Service program webpage at esign.hawaii.gov.

THG is proud to return as a sponsor of the Hawaii Annual Code Challenge (HACC), the state hackathon, which links up coders in the community with participating state departments to collaborate on solutions to challenges currently plaguing agencies.

Now in its third year, the theme of the 2018 HACC will be sustainability, and the event is being combined with the state’s AGathon. Register today!

Coders of all ages and backgrounds are invited to the highly anticipated civic coding competition, which the state will kickoff on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the East-West Center’s Hawaii Imin International Conference Center.

The HACC breaks away from the typical time-crunched hackathon format spanning a mere day or a single weekend. This year’s HACC will allocate three weeks for solution development and supplies interim workshops to assist teams with their presentations and programs.

At the kickoff, participants will form teams and accept their challenges based on pitches from several the state departments, then proceed to develop their concepts and prototypes throughout the duration of the competition. The challenge culminates with a Judging and Awards event on Saturday, Nov. 10.

Previous years resulted in a wayfinding mobile app for the University of Hawaii Manoa campus; a mobile-friendly, searchable Hawaii Revised Statutes app; and more.

The HACC is an annual event conceived by Gov. David Y. Ige and coordinated by theOffice of Enterprise Technology Services in partnership with the High Technology Development Corporation, DevLeague, and others. For more details or to register, visit hacc.hawaii.gov.

In July, State of Hawaii Office of Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) announced that a six-month paper-reduction pilot program involving nine state departments reduced paper use by 20 percent, which translates to a savings of one million sheets of printed paper.

One of Gov. David Ige’s first goals for his administration was to transform government into a more paperless and digital process.

“I am told that the state goes through about one million pages a month,” Ige said in his first State of the State address back in 2015. “That’s about 12 million pages a year. A little effort could go a long way to alter that. A change in mindset could take us so much further. We must reduce the amount of paper we use every day…”

Three and a half years later, the governor is applauding the state’s successful efforts to transform from a paper-dependent culture to a digital environment, which also improves public accessibility to government documents and increases transparency for our citizens.

“As we continue to reduce paper processes and transform government through digitalization, it encourages the adoption of new technology, while improving the efficiency and effectiveness of our S]state,” said Todd Nacapuy, state chief information officer, who leads ETS. “Paper reduction is beneficial for the environment as well as for our tax payers.”

According to ETS, one of the ways they reduced paper usage was transitioning departments into producing electronic reports instead of printing hard-copy documents. ETS projects additional benefits in coming years as more departments and agencies reduce or entirely eliminate printed paper reports by moving to digital documents. In three years, ETS even projects a savings of $500,000 and 10 million sheets of printed paper.

The latest offering in THG’s free speaker series provides attendees with an insightful look into conducting elections in today’s tech-centric society. “Elections in the Tech Era” features Chief Elections Officer Scott Nago and his team who will share ways voter registration has been optimized while protecting thre integrity of election results.

Rescheduled from its original date, this exciting event will now take place on Wednesday, September 5 at Impact Hub Honoulu. Deadline for registration is Tuesday, Sept. 4.Reserve your seat here: http://bit.ly/THGElections

 

 

The Department Dashboard tracks 16 branches of the executive government

Looking at the wall of blue squares as they toggling into formation behind State of Hawaii Chief Information Officer (CIO) Todd Nacapuy, a passerby at the Impact Hub could have mistaken the projection as edgy, innovative decor. However, to the attendees in the room, each square represented a visualized portion of nearly half a billion dollars of the state’s IT projects.

The Transform Hawaii Government (THG) coalition held its first thought-provoking speaker series event with the help of the state Office of Enterprise Technology Services and Rep. Mark M. Nakashima  on July 25 in Kakaako.

CIO Nacapuy along with his team shared examples of how the financial tracking tool promotes government transparency for stakeholders such as legislators, state agencies, and the general public through an interactive demonstration of the Hawaii Department Dashboard.

The Office of Enterprise Technology Services employees maintain the dashboard with continuous input from the various departments. It tracks the progress of current and upcoming IT projects including financial overviews as well as project timelines. Below are some takeaways from the event.

 

Changing the [Money] Conversation

The Office of Enterprise Technology Services meets monthly with individual state departments (with the exception of the Department of Education and the University of Hawaii System, which are administered and led by their respective boards) so that all verified IT projects are represented on the dashboard.

Senate President Kouchi

Senate President Ronald Kouchi commended the Office of Enterprise Technology Service for its work on the dashboard.

“What it [the Hawaii Department Dashboard] does is it now changes the conversation. All of our financial systems are now linked together, meaning that when a department now puts in a budget request, we see it and it gets displayed on the roadmap,” said Nacapuy during his presentation.

According to the CIO, if IT project requests are not listed on the dashboard, then budget approval is denied, which encourages departments to develop planning “roadmaps” and anticipate any future savings. The protocol, in turn, has somewhat dampened the age-old practice of “use it or lose it” for departmental expenditures on the state government IT level.

 

Cost Savings

CIO Nacapuy answers an audience member's inquiry regarding the Hawaii Department Dashboard

CIO Nacapuy answers an audience member’s inquiry regarding the Hawaii Department Dashboard

Based on analysis of the data, the State of Hawaii also leveraged economies of scale to get significant savings on enterprise contracts for commonly used software.

“We looked across the state as a whole, and we were spending almost $2 million a year on Adobe Acrobat Pro. Many departments used the software to make PDFs ADA compliant. So we went back to Adobe and were able to reduce the contract rate significantly,” said Nacapuy.

 

This year, ETS is looking to continue this rate for the next three years.

 

 

Empirical Data as a Single Source of Truth

“Modernizing these systems are going to help us get there so that we can give our legislators empirical data to make the right decisions”

 

Lastly, during the legislative session, bills which request additional funding to support multi-year IT projects are not uncommon. Fiscal dashboards like the department dashboard benefit Hawaii’s legislators with empirical data to make decisions derived from facts as opposed to special interests.

When asked what success for the dashboard will look like in a year, Nacapuy said, “modernizing these systems is going to help us get there so that we can give our legislators empirical data to make the right decisions, so they are no longer relying on lobbyists to give them information. We’re trying to give them true information through data. That’s where we need to go, that’s what we’re trying to do and what that end goal is.” 

Hawaii’s state deparment dashboard was made possible with thte passage of Senate Bill 2807 SD2 (later signed into law as Act 58 of 2016), which consolidated two programs to establish the Office of Enterprise Technology Services and expanded the state CIO’s authority to work with departments to develop and maintain their IT “roadmaps.”

Explore the dashboard using the link below and stay tuned for upcoming THG Speaker Series events.
https://my.sharpcloud.com/html/#/story/b04657dc-0318-4db8-a58f-b4ebd9e24dde/view/5bcb4b33-a824-43cb-9e06-8733e28296bd

HACC community partners take a photo with Gov. David Ige. Photo courtesy of the Office of Enterprise Technology Services.

Earlier this month, CIO Todd Nacapuy accepted StateScoop.com’s State IT Innovation award on behalf of the Hawaii Annual Code Challenge (HACC). StateScoop annually honors outstanding state innovators, up-and-coming leaders as well as tech-based projects used to make the delivery of services more convenient to residents.

“As a proud sponsor of the 2017 Hawaii Annual Code Challenge, Transform Hawaii Government congratulates CIO Todd Nacapuy and his community co-partner Hawaii Open Data, for putting on the successful and innovative event, which provided the tech-minded development community with the opportunity to test their skills at coming up with creative solutions to government challenges,” said Christine Sakuda, THG executive director. “As a nonprofit coalition dedicated to promoting an open, transparent and responsive government, we recognize the ‘HACC’ as an outstanding example of how the state can engage the community in a meaningful way to streamline, integrate and deliver state services to meet and exceed the expectations of the public and Hawaii’s businesses, while helping to build Hawaii’s IT workforce.”

The State IT Innovation of the Year award recognizes win-win state government programs which bridge their constituent’s experience and makes efficient use of data integration for agencies. Hawaii’s hackathon joins notable programs from other states including Georgia Gateway, an integrated multi-program portal for human services; Utah’s Practice Driver License Program, an app to help drivers study for their driver’s license using smartphones and smart speakers like Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home; and Mississippi’s state chatbot called MISSI which uses machine learning to connect inquiries to the proper services. See all winners here.

With more than 300 participants in its sophomore year, the HACC brought together Hawaii’s programming community, state departments and the local tech industry to solve real-world information challenges provided by participating agencies. The month-long competition fostered mentoring for burgeoning coders and created proof of concepts for an app used to navigate within UH Manoa, a grant data visualizer for OHA, and enabling natural language searchability and interpretation of Hawaii’s laws.

The HACC was possible through the collaboration between the State of Hawaii and participating community partners such as Hawaii Open Data, DevLeague, and THG.

Hawaii’s remote geographic location and limited talent pool – while nothing new – have compounded a decades-long hiring challenge for state government. After a highly successful pilot project initiated in 2016, the Office of Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) continues its innovative use of the professional social networking site LinkedIn as a tool for attracting top talent.

Besides using the world’s largest social networking platform for business professionals, ETS also changed its paradigm to revamp its employee culture. View this video case study to discover how the agency leveraged LinkedIn to meet and surpass its hiring goals.

For more information, read LinkedIn’s Talent Blog: 4 Ways the Government of Hawaii Modernized its Hiring Process to Attract Tech Talent.

Featured in THG’s January newsletter, the Hawaii Department Dashboard now has a new, more user-friendly look. A first of its kind in the nation, the dashboard tracks more than 400 IT projects across State of Hawaii departments and agencies that account for nearly half a billion dollars in annual IT spend, according to the Office of Enterprise Technology Services.

 

The dashboard is accessible to the public and can be found at The Hawaii Department Dashboard or by visiting ets.hawaii.gov and scrolling to the bottom of the webpage.

HCR 94 hearing

Inefficiency translates to lost time, dollars and increased frustration for small businesses. That includes the time and effort it takes to extract data sets from government agencies.

State legislators appear to agree that it is time for the state to formally adopted a statewide strategic plan for information technology projects, especially when hundreds of millions of dollars are invested in modernizing and maintaining the state’s multitude of IT systems each year.

HCR 94 and SCR 42 call for the development of a state IT strategic plan to include data goals and objectives. THG strongly supports these resolutions and agrees that the commitment of state leadership to strategic information technology transformation over the long term is essential to the government’s ability to successfully leverage technology toward improving services for Hawaii’s residents and businesses.

HCR 94 was recently heard by the House Committee on Labor and Public Employment, which received strong support from the community and no opposition.  The resolution passed unanimously and moved on to the finance committee where it awaits a hearing date.

“… many states and major municipalities across the United States have adopted open data driven policies that require government agencies to collect and publish data, as well as promote data collection and sharing in the private sector, in recognition that access to empirical data is critical to providing decision makers with the information they need to make informed decisions in the interest of citizens …” —  HCR 94 / SCR 42

While progress has been made since the Legislature established the position of the State of Hawai‘i Chief Information Officer in 2010, a long-term IT strategic plan has yet to be adopted. Such a plan is necessary to:

  • Improve the delivery of programs and services to citizens, businesses and within state government;
  • Maximize our state’s potential for greater accountability, efficiency, and transparency in the use of taxpayer dollars;
  • Best secure protected data and critical infrastructure; and
  • Sufficiently empower our state’s workforce to meet the demands of an increasingly technology-dependent workplace.

Further, as the resolutions recognize, many states across the nation have adopted open data-driven policies that require agencies to collect, maintain and make accessible, where permissible, a variety of data and information to ensure decision-makers have the information they need to make informed decisions in shaping the future of our state. However, our state’s data remains decentralized, limiting the opportunities for integration and achieving data goals.

THG urges coalition members and other like-minded individuals to express their support of these measures as they move forward. Helpful tips on submitting your own testimony are available are THG’s 2018 Priority Legislation webpage.

Net Neutrality | ETS

 

Net neutrality protects and promotes a fast, fair and open internet. It prohibits internet service providers from discriminating between content or users. However, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to end net neutrality rules on Dec. 13, 2017.

Since the Internet does not distinguish between state boarders, individual states may be unable to directly enforce their own net neutrality laws. But that has not stopped multiple states, including Hawaii, from working to manage the effects on local levels.

An executive order signed by Gov. David Ige took effect on Feb. 5, 2018, directing all state government agencies to contract for internet-related service only with providers who contractually agree to abide by net neutrality principals.

These types of regulations could have a significant impact on many providers as state contracts tend to be large.

A recent poll showed that 83 percent of Americans disapprove of the FCC’s action to repeal net neutrality. Most recently, members of Hawaii’s Congressional delegation joined their U.S. House and Senate colleagues to introduce a measure designed to overturn the FCC decision on net neutrality.

Hawaii legislators have also expressed support for maintaining net neutrality in Hawaii.  This includes House Bill 1995 that, if enacted, would aim to regulates broadband internet service providers to ensure a free and open Internet. The bill also would establish a task force to examine the costs and benefits of creating a state-owned public utility company to provide broadband internet service.